Nissan: Get a fast charger installed fast, get some fast cash

Nissan is redoubling its efforts to expand the US network of DC fast charging stations with a generous new incentive program.

Nissan’s EV Advantage program offers $10,000 to businesses or other groups that deploy CHAdeMO-compatible public charging stations, with an additional bonus of $5,000 if the station is up and running by the end of the year. Stations installed by December 31 may also be eligible for the Federal Alternative Fuel Infrastructure tax credit, which covers 30 percent of installation costs, up to a maximum of $30,000.

Given an estimated total cost of $40,000, a chart provided by the company shows that the net cost to install a public charger could be as low as $13,000, or even zero in states, such as Oregon, that offer additional incentives.

Nissan is offering the incentive only in regions where lots of LEAFs already live, or where the company “sees growth coming,” including Oregon, Seattle, San Francisco, Atlanta, Raleigh-Durham and St. Louis. Likely sites for charging stations include retail stores, restaurants, office buildings, churches, hospitals and other institutions.

This is good news for anyone thinking of installing a public charger, and for drivers of the LEAF and other CHAdeMO-compatible EVs. It’s also interesting news in light of two ongoing issues in the EVSE world.

First, there are two competing fast charging standards, and there may or may not be a war brewing. Is Nissan offering such generous incentives because it wants to see stations using its CHAdeMO standard proliferate as quickly as possible, before the rival SAE Combo standard can gain a foothold?

Second, some industry observers are asking whether there will be a viable business model for public charging providers, once government incentives for installing chargers dry up. Who, if anyone, is going to make money from public charging, and how do Nissan and other EV-makers fit into the picture?

 

Source: Nissan, Green Car Reports