PG&E’s EV Charge Network to install 7,500 new charging stations

Volt ClipperCreek Charging 4 (Charles Morris) L

Under its new EV Charge Network program, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) will install 7,500 new Level 2 charging stations at condominiums, apartment buildings and workplaces across Northern and Central California.

The focus is on increasing access to charging in locations where it has traditionally been limited and where cars often sit for longer periods of time, such as workplaces and apartment buildings.

The three-year program will continue through 2020, with a budget of $130 million.  PG&E will pay for and build the infrastructure from the electric grid to the charger, and will also offset a portion of the hardware cost for all participating customers. Site hosts can choose to own their charging equipment, and can choose chargers from a list of pre-qualified vendors.

At least 15 percent of the chargers will be installed in disadvantaged communities.

“California continues to lead the nation in the fight against climate change, and clean transportation is critical to building our sustainable energy future,” said PG&E CEO Geisha Williams. “One in five EVs in the US plugs into PG&E’s clean energy grid.”

 

Source: Pacific Gas and Electric

 

  • Ormond Otvos

    10 adjoining spaces 8×20 plus two of them ADA compliant? $40k for 10 chargers? My 40 amp level 2 cost $350 with a 27′ cord! Fake compliance…

    • Oveta

      Your 40 amp level 2 will not charge a Tesla very well. Also, this assumes you have access to power near your parking space. Most parking garages are not set up that way, so it is a lot more complex to to add level 2 charging. PG&E is picking up the cost for the infrastructure so I am not sure where I see this is a bad thing, nor do I see what any of this has to do with compliance fake or otherwise.

      • Ormond Otvos

        Nor will it cost $27,000. A half-empty 200 miles range Bolt, for instance, with a 60 kWh battery needs 30 kWh . A 40 amp/240 volt/7.5 kW charger will do that in 4 hours. or 8 hours for a half-empty Tesla.
        Wiring for a DCFC is MUCH more expensive due to the large wiring, conduit and transformers. 40 amp/8 kw kw is the way to go to hit the vast majority of reasonably priced BEV’s.
        In addition, DCFC as a regular occurrence is advised against due to lithium plating damage building up.
        How much of those millions goes to bureaucrats?

        • Oveta

          Where did it say DCFC were being used? I am talking to Level 2.

          • Ormond Otvos

            I agree you’re confused.
            If you don’t accept a 40 amp as a Level 2, why talk about Teslas? Their batteries aren’t THAT big…

          • Oveta

            A Tesla Model X charging off a 40 amp circuit is going to only get 20 miles of range per hour of charging. Too slow, in my opinion. But I still do not see what your outrage is about. Can a company not spend their money how they want to?

          • joelado

            Not if the rate payers have anything to say about it. In the EV community there has always been this feeling that an unreal argument for EVs was that the infrastructure was going to be prohibitively expensive to put in, when we have always known that the infrastructure is already present.
            .
            According to AAA nearly all drivers in the USA drive less than 32 miles a day. The Chevy Volts battery was built around the US60 study done by the US Department of Transportation that quantified how US drivers drive. It stated that 2 full deviations over the mean, 94% drove less than 40 miles a day. You can get 40 miles plus range out of a regular household outlet in an 8 hour period. For day to day driving you don’t need a 240 volt outlet. The at home level 2 charger reduces that time at the lowest end to around 1 hour at 7.2 kW. A Tesla or Bolt may take longer to charge from zero to 200 miles but you will be able to charge it enough overnite to get you to work and back.
            .
            Cars are typically used only for an hour or two in a day, so that leaves you typically 22 hours to charge. Let’s say you don’t charge at work that would leave you 16 hours to charge. That would give you 80 miles of range with a 110v outlet. In a few days you would be back to full using 40 miles, but getting back 80 miles while charging on 110.
            .
            However, for convenience sake a faster charger is always nice to have. The J1772 2009 maximum charging standard for level 2 is 240v split phase 80A 19.20 kW. This would mean it would take around 23 minutes to get 40 miles out of a charge. You would get 120 miles out of an hour at home, and 200 miles in around 2 hours, at home! If cars are able to receive the 19.2 kW standard and there are charger companies that would be willing make the chargers to the max of the j1772 standard, the EV experience would be better than that of gasoline. Tesla vehicles can already receive this max j1772.
            .
            The Tesla Model 3 and the Chevy Bolt have thrown down a challenge to the industry to go with a 200 mile range standard. Now all other EV manufacturers are producing or have plans to produce EVs with 200 mile range. That is over 6 times what AAA says is the full use of a vehicle on a daily basis. That means that the only time EV owners with 200 plus ranges will need to charge will be when they are away from home on long trips of over 200 miles round trip. Tesla already knows this, hence the Tesla long distance infrastructure.
            .
            PG&E should understand this and focus their investment on charging that will be most needed and not waste its ratepayers money on doing other things that won’t be need in the very, very near future.

      • joelado

        All you need for apartment parking is a designated space close to the breaker box that services the lights and electricity for the garage. After that we are only talking about conduit, electrical cable and a breaker. If you want to have an outlet version of the charger you will have to pay for the plug. The cost of materials is minimal. Where cost rise is the labor for an electrician to run the conduit and maybe drilling through concrete or trenching for outdoor asphalt parking lots. Let’s put the electrical work at a $1,000 average per install and the charger at $500. Just so you know where I am coming from, I put in a home level 2 EVSE that was 50 feet from the breaker box and it cost me $1,500 with trenching and going through a concrete wall. After I had it done an electrician friend of mine looked at the scope of the work and told me that I should have paid only $1,000 for the install. Oh well. So, the $1,000 for install on average is somewhat based on reality. Some installs will be easy and only require an hour or two for the electrician to do, while others will cost more because there is more to do. A good level 2 charger today costs between $374 to $699 according to Google Shopping, so the $500 price is a good estimate. We have grounded the cost in reality. This is the way I would do cost and feasibility studies for my MBA and for consulting.
        .
        PG&E could do 11 to 12 full installs for the money that they are saying it will cost them to do 1. In a normal utility business, because utilities are regulated monopolies and prices are set by the state, profitability is made by being more efficient. Reducing cost is the watchword for regulated utilities. It doesn’t make sense that a utility would pay so much more than it has to with its money. The only way that a utility would do this outrageous cost per installation is that they are gaming the system. They aren’t losing the money from these installs, someone else is. I believe that we the taxpayer is getting stuck with this bill through poorly made legislation or the losses from this transaction will give the utility the ability to ask for an increase in rates. This whole thing doesn’t pass the smell test. We as ratepayers and taxpayers need to wake up when presented with something as absurd as this.

    • joelado

      $130,000,000 divided by 7,500 is $17,333.33 a charger. How about we go with 3,000 DC fast charging stations instead. “NRG eVgo, found that given the option of both chargers at a single site, drivers preferred DCQCs 12-to-1 over Level 2 charging. (2016)” “Nissan currently offers one for less than $10,000. BMW sells its CCS charger for less than $7,000. (2016)” In 2016 and 2017 it cost on average to install a Blink DC Fast Charger $22,626. Some installations were as high as around $50,000 and they had some installations that were as low as around $8,000. This according to Blink. This was not the average of a single bulk purchase as the above plan could be done, which allows for economies of scale, multi-competitor bidding and negotiating the price downwards. This looks like the corruption of a process that we sorely need to benefit current and future EV owners. Future EV owners that will number in the hundreds of thousands of citizens. Hundreds of thousands if we don’t screw it up like this.

      • Gary

        DC fast chargers are not what you want for something like an apartment complex. Fast charging as your only source of charging will hurt the battery life. You would be much better off adding many simple level 2 chargers where people charge overnight without needing to move their cars. I’m sure the NRG eVgo driver preference you mentioned is more geared to people that ALREADY have home chargers, and want something more remote.

        • joelado

          An inexpensive home charger would do fine for a designated parking spot for people in apartments. You don’t need a commercial level 2 charger for that. When I installed my home charger my electrician found that my breaker panel was the subject of a serious recall many years ago because it was defective. I ended up having to do extensive electrical work on my house to put my $400 7.2kW Siemens charger in. The total of everything was around $4,500. At my previous home my total install for a Chargepoint charger was less than $2,000. Let’s just say that every level 2 charger installation is $4,500 the very most I have spent putting in a charger. You would only need $33,750,000 to install all of the 7,500 level 2 chargers. Let’s say that it cost double to purchase and install a commercial level 2 charger. Your total outlay would be $67.5 million, which would leave $62.5 million. According to the department of energy the median price to install an DC quick charger is $27,500. A little more than the average stated by Blink. That would still leave enough money to install 2,272 DC quick chargers. As EVs reach a base of 200 miles range per charge, 99% of charging is going to be done at either home or at stops on highways for long trips. Level 2 chargers would probably be desirable at hotels. Outside of that quick chargers would meet most of an EV owner’s needs while away from home. Quick chargers on highways is the only hurdle that EVs need to make to become mainstream. Tesla already knows this.

          • John Trotter

            Amen !