Torqeedo’s Deep Blue Hybrid offers flexible power system for boat propulsion and accessories

Torqeedo Deep Blue Hybrid

Torqeedo, a manufacturer of electric boat motors, has announced its new Deep Blue Hybrid, an integrated system that acts as an energy supply for both a vessel’s hybrid drive and all AC/DC electrical loads on board. This solution allows boat owners to harness solar, wind, plug-in and regenerative power in the system’s high-capacity batteries, keeping generator runtime to an absolute minimum.

Always-available electrical power has many applications. Recreational sailors can power house loads, such as air conditioning and cooking, with batteries alone, enjoying the comforts of home with no generator noise or exhaust. Work and service boats can run large tools, winches, and test equipment directly off the batteries. Environmental research and monitoring vessels can access sensitive areas and take measurements in clean, quiet, and undisturbed water conditions.

The modular nature of the components means Deep Blue Hybrid can be configured to match the specific requirements of each application. It is available as inboard, outboard, or saildrive in the 40 to 160 hp power classes, and as a single or twins.

“Taking existing Deep Blue components and adding the utility of multiple charging sources was the next logical development for this powerful system,” said Torqeedo President Steve Trkla. “Deep Blue Hybrid offers all the benefits of pure electric propulsion, including an unprecedented level of luxury and utility on board, while allowing for extended motoring. It is proving to be a very compelling option for cruising sailboats between 40 and 80 feet, as well as professionally operated vessels.”

Torqeedo Deep Blue Hybrid 2

 

Source: Torqeedo

  • Jeff Theisen

    It about time somebody had the guts to design and offer this great system….kudos to the

  • http://ambitiousbit.com/ Jonathan Lambert

    Does anyone know about how much a system like this costs? That’s about a ~2M USD boat, so I imagine it’s hundreds of thousands. But I can’t find any information on how much a system like this goes for. A typical electrification system for the engines from a company like http://www.electricyacht.com/ costs ~20-30k, and there’s a startup doing it for ~12k for small craft in the bay area. Just curious whether this system is financially viable at all, because I love the idea.