Chrysler partners with McMaster University to develop advanced electric powertrains

Chrysler has entered a five-year, $18.2 million partnership with McMaster University, with funding support from the Canadian government, to develop next-generation electrified powertrains. Chrysler Group will invest $9.25 million in cash and in-kind contributions, with an additional $8.93 million coming from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

20 Chrysler engineers and seven McMaster engineers will team with 16 faculty members and 80 engineering students. Chrysler will be on the lookout to add to its engineering ranks from the pool of McMaster graduates, according to VP Bob Lee.

The partnership will explore six facets of vehicle electrification:

  • Electrified powertrain architecture and optimization
  • Power electronics
  • Electric machines
  • Motor control
  • Energy management systems
  • Embedded software

Researchers will focus on developing affordable technologies. For example, the electric machine activity will target ways to reduce rare-earth mineral content in the motor magnets. Component reliability, durability, weight, size and scalability will also be primary considerations.

“Our Government is investing in automotive research and development to put greener, better-performing vehicles on the road to create jobs, strengthen the economy and improve the quality of life of Canadians,” said Greg Rickford, Canada’s Minister of State for Science and Technology. “Automotive Partnership Canada does just this – builds research capacity, drives innovation, and increases the competitiveness of our industries.”

Chrysler issued its usual “Gee dad, do we have to?” statement: “Legislative pressure and socioeconomic forces are compelling the auto industry to deliver unparalleled technological advancement at an unprecedented rate,” said Bob Lee. “Chrysler Group is grateful for the support of the Canadian government and McMaster University.”

 

Source: Chrysler