The new LightningElectric conversion package for the Ford Transit

Loveland, Colorado-based Lightning Systems is accepting pre-orders for its new LightningElectric conversion package for the Ford Transit. Deliveries will begin in early 2018.

The product will be available first on heavy-duty Transits with a 10,360-pound gross vehicle weight rating. Conversions and service are performed by Ford QVM-certified upfitters and dealers. Installation can be completed in just hours. In the US, the conversion is priced at $69,000 for vehicles with a range of 50 miles and $89,000 for a range of 100 miles.

LightningElectric features a liquid-cooled battery system from “a volume-ready world-class battery supplier.” Depending on battery option and drive cycle, LightningElectric vehicles will have a payload capacity of up to 4,000 pounds.

Lightning Systems worked with New Eagle on the mechatronic controls for the system, and chose UQM Technologies to provide several powertrain components, including the gearbox, motor and inverter, as well as software controls.

Both the LightningElectric and LightningHybrid systems are certified by Ford’s new eQVM program, under which conversions performed by certified firms retain the original powertrain warranty and can use Ford’s dealer service network.

LightningAnalytics, a cloud-based analytics system that provides real-time drive, route and predictive vehicle health information, is available as an option on LightningElectric vehicles.

“The new LightningElectric is an excellent choice for commercial and government fleets that would like a zero-emissions product that uses no fuel, but gets the job done with no compromises,” said Lightning VP of Sales David Brosky. “The braking and acceleration feels like a gasoline-powered Ford Transit. The vehicle is smooth and quiet with excellent performance and will please both drivers and passengers.”

 

Source: Lightning Systems

  • Paul Zigouras

    I hope this turns out to be more successful than the Ford Transit Connect that Azure Dynamics did a few years ago. They barely sold 500 of them. I think the issue at the time was that consumers could not justify paying $75,000 for a truck that normally costs $24,000 — and got almost 30 MPG on the highway to begin with. But maybe this time around, it will be worth it.

  • Michael Walsh

    Onward and upward and let’s stop choking on fumes and wrecking the climate!!