Clean Cars Nevada initiative aims to establish zero-emission standard

As the US federal government continues its war on emissions standards, an increasing number of state governments have adopted more stringent standards, based in whole or in part on those of California. The next Clean Air State could be Nevada, if a new proposal is adopted.

The draft Clean Cars Nevada initiative has two parts. The Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standard will require automakers to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and particulate matter. The Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) standard will set minimum sales goals for EVs as a percentage of all vehicles sold in Nevada. 

The new rules are to go into effect starting with model year 2025. Automakers will be allowed to bank early low- and zero-emission credits starting with model year 2023.

Through 2021, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will engage with stakeholders and convene public workshops to refine the regulation. The proposal will then need to be adopted by the State Environmental Commission and the Legislative Commission.

“Now more than ever, it is critical for Nevada to continue accelerating efforts to address climate change including capturing the many benefits of sustainable transportation options for Nevadans,” said Governor Steve Sisolak. “This kind of decisive action is the first of many steps we will be taking as part of my commitment to addressing climate change under the State of Nevada Climate Initiative.”

“Transportation is the number one source of greenhouse gases in Nevada,” said Bradley Crowell, Director of the Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. “To move Nevada’s climate future forward, we must reduce pollution from the cars and trucks we drive as well as modernize our urban planning efforts through transit-oriented development and electrification of our transportation infrastructure.”

Source: Nevada Department of Conservation & Natural Resources via Plug In America