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Charged Electric Vehicles Magazine
Issue 28 – November/December 2016

Featuring

Seaworthy EVs: Leclanché designs and manufactures Li-ion cells and systems

The advantages of electrifying transportation are far-reaching. Advanced energy storage systems are even making their way into the commercial marine industry. There are many marine applications in which adding a large Li-ion battery pack makes a lot of sense. The best-use case varies depending on the boat size and purpose. All-electric ferries, for example, are… Read more »

Turnkey drivetrains: UQM, Eaton and Pi Innovo collaborate to help build better heavy-duty EVs

We write about electric buses a lot at Charged. That’s because, as our July/August cover story pointed out, we think that e-buses will inevitably become the top choice for cities and municipalities. This could happen a lot quicker than many people realize, and some have predicted that transit buses will be the first segment in… Read more »

An airbag for battery packs: PyroPhobic says its unique thermoplastics will stop thermal runaway

Engineers have been searching for ways to mitigate the risk of fire with Li-ion batteries since the technology was first commercialized. Chemists are creating new cell formulations that are less prone to problems, electronics experts are designing fail-safe battery management systems, and mechanical engineers are building complex cooling and fire suppression systems. A common rule… Read more »

Will America maintain its EV lead?

Here at Charged, we believe EVs are for everyone, regardless of political leanings. While we certainly comment on government policies that we feel are pro- or anti-EV, we avoid endorsing any particular candidate or party. However, America has elected a new president who has promised a radical change from the policies of the past eight… Read more »

VW to provide $2 billion for ZEV infrastructure, drawing criticism and praise from insiders

By now, the main events in Volkswagen’s dirty diesel scandal are familiar to Charged readers. For years, the world’s second-largest automaker opted not to produce hybrids or EVs, instead relying on “clean diesel” to meet government-mandated emissions standards. In 2015, scientists at the International Council on Clean Transportation were puzzled to find that they couldn’t… Read more »

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